Sub 600 Mbps download, 940 Mbps upload

Internet access discussion, including Fusion, IP Broadband, and Gigabit Fiber!
9 posts Page 1 of 1
by raylam » Thu Mar 14, 2019 5:16 pm
I am testing my new Gigabit connection with Speedtest's desktop client, directly connected to the ONT. (I think that's the right term? The modem anyway.)

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My laptop is a 2012 13" Macbook Air with a Thunderbolt Ethernet adapter that, according to the system profile, supports up to 10 Gbps.

So the upstream looks right, but what's going on with the downstream?

And of course the speeds deteriorate as expected when testing over 802.11N—I wonder if this can be better:

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I'm trying to test, troubleshoot, and tune my home setup but want to verify I can get the correct speeds first. As I mentioned in the Gigabit Berkeley thread, I was or still am the first in my building to be activated, are there "kinks" to be worked out?

I've read a few posts that testing via ONT with a desktop client is the best and typically there are no issues in the backend and it's usually the home setup that's the bottleneck.
by raylam » Thu Mar 14, 2019 5:44 pm
I have an unRAID NAS (Gigabyte motherboard with 2 x Intel® GbE LAN chips (10/100/1000 Mbit)) connected with Cat 5e to the Sonic SR515AC router. I installed a Speedtest docker and this is what I get:

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by cdrayson » Fri Mar 15, 2019 5:10 pm
I think that's probably just the limit to what your computer can handle. Just because the protocol is gigabit, doesn't mean it can deal with all that data. My 2009 MacPro tops out at about 750.

It's not unusual for the upstream to be faster.
by raylam » Fri Mar 15, 2019 5:14 pm
cdrayson wrote:
I think that's probably just the limit to what your computer can handle. Just because the protocol is gigabit, doesn't mean it can deal with all that data. My 2009 MacPro tops out at about 750.

It's not unusual for the upstream to be faster.


Oh that's interesting, I knew CPU is a factor but kinda assumed because it's a laptop, it'll be fine ... :lol: I have a 2 GHz Intel Core i7 in my MBA.

Now I wish I had gotten the installation guy to do a speedtest before he left.
by Zandr » Mon Mar 18, 2019 5:58 pm
That 520/940 result is about what I was seeing on my iMac on ethernet when testing with Speedtest in Firefox. Switching to the Speedtest app from the Mac App store gave me 930+ up and down, with no other changes.
by raylam » Tue Mar 19, 2019 8:31 pm
Unfortunately that's what I'm seeing with the Speedtest app.
by cmeisel » Wed Mar 20, 2019 9:09 am
You should always use the native speed SpeedTest.net app for Mac or windows. That'll eliminate browser bottlenecks that can impair results.
by raylam » Wed Mar 20, 2019 9:49 am
Is there some other app I'm unaware of? I mentioned in my first post and the one before your post that I'm using the Speedtest desktop app ... too bad I only have my one 2012 laptop to test this on.
by miken » Wed Mar 20, 2019 12:34 pm
The download portion of a speedtest uses more CPU than the upload portion. You can see this if you open Task Manager (or the Mac equivalent) and run a speedtest and monitor the CPU performance. If you have any open applications, closing them can help the speedtest results, but this could ultimately be a limitation of your hardware (if we want to consider half a gigabit download speed a limitation). 8-)
Mike N.
Development Trainer
Sonic
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